Glass Etching Cream: You Know How To Use It?

Glass etching cream is used by many hobbyists to create designs on all different types of glass. It is an easy product to use that is also very inexpensive. You can create many different etched designs on items for your home, or use it to make the perfect gift for that someone special.

This cream comes with a special diluted acid known as hydrofluoric acid that eats/etches the exterior of your glass quite lightly. It’s used for effectively etching designs into great looking glass cups and/or wine glasses. Yet, they might be used for a lot other things as well.

It’s used to easily create designs on glassware such as cups, decorative objects or wine glasses. It’s a very simple process to get professional looking results from using glass etching cream. By using the glass etching cream techniques there’s no end to the amount of items you will be able to create.

You can design fantastic looking glassware, personalized nameplates, mirrors, ornaments, or even toys. You can even make different designs by using quality acrylic paints to add some colors to your etchings.

Since glass etching is so affordable and simple process, it is indeed a very feasible as well as profitable opportunity for your income. Nowadays, everybody is looking forward to ways for earning more without any mammoth start-up costs and/or time away.

You can also create or purchase glass etching stencils so you can create themed glassware or just use favorite designs again and again. By saving stencil designs on your computer you can save time instead of trying to recreate them on your own every time. Just print your created designs on some durable film-like paper. That way you can keep using these stencils in your various creations.

Learn more about Glass Etching Cream Click here to know more about Glass Etching Cream tips.

ERII Goblet 1977
glass etching designs
Image by frankthrower.glassdesigns
Made in clear glass and etched to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, and has original first quality gold sticker

Height 6 inches / 150mm & diameter 3.25 inches / 85mm

One of limited edition of 200, which would make it a scarce if not rare item

Original Rummer Service Wine Glass design by Frank Thrower for Dartington Glass 1969

Architectural Laser Cutting

Today’s clients are demanding increasingly complicated architectural designs, requiring equally complicated and precise cutting methods. Because of this, laser cutting is becoming an incredibly valuable manufacturing tool. As well as offering a more precise way of cutting wood, metal, and many other materials, you can use laser cutting to add any number of distinctive features to a building’s metalwork.

Laser cutting technology enables fabricators to work with metal surfaces that have delecate finished and would be damaged or destroyed by other cutting techniques. Further more, lasers can be used to cut glass, wood, ceramics, and any other surfaces used in construction. Architects are free to use numerous sorts of materials and finishes that wouldn’t have been practical previously, allowing for better structural and aesthetic design.

Many laser cutting businesses will work closely with architects through the design stage, but they can also work from pre-supplied computer files in most cases. With the technology available today, laser etching can replicate almost any artwork or design desired on a metal surface. Designs that were once difficult or impossible to cut are childs play for a laser cutter.

As laser cutting is quicker and much more efficient than mechanical cutting, and since it can be accomplished by workers with minimal amounts of training, laser cutting companies are often a lot more flexible in working with the last minute changes that are so sometimes part of large construction projects.

Laser cutting can be used to fulfill numerous architectural needs, such as sheet metal finishing, cutting intricate metal panels and parts. By eliminating the down-time generally associated with metal cutting and etching, laser cutters can also reduce costs. The apparatus is also fairly easy to set up, helping to reduce labour costs. The fact that laser cutters don’t wear out over time and do not require replacement blades will also help to reduce costs, as well as ensuring consistency.

In addition to sheet metal, architectural laser cutting can be used to create artwork, the tubing needed for stairways and various other architectural purposes. Whatever the shape desired, laser cutting can realize it much more quickly and efficiently than older cutting techniques. If your designs have been stonewalled in the past by a metal worker’s lack of ability to achieve your vision, laser cutting will alleviate many of your problems.

Take a leap into the future of architecture and check out architectural laser cutting. Architecture and lasers go together like fish and chips. Not only will you be able to do things with design that you had previously believed impossible, you will be able to do them quicker, and without spending an excessive amount of money. Laser cutting also creates less waste, and what little waste it does leave can be cleaned up using an ordinary vacuum cleaner. Imagine being able to cut metal without leaving metal shavings, cutting wood with no sawdust. Imagine the time and inconvenience that you can save by using precision laser cutting in your architectural design.

Marc Anderes is the VP of Operations of Maloya Laser that is dedicated to Laser Cutting and Metal Manufacturing with state-of-the-art laser technologies, targeting medical, aerospace, scientific and transportation requirements.

Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Giving unto others
glass etching designs
Image by familymwr
Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Giving unto others

Photo By: SPC Paul Harris

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History
After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.
On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.
In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work… Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm…”
In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.
In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion …to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”
Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.
To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.
The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.
After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.
Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.
Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.
Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.
In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.
Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.
While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.
In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”
The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.
In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”
In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.
The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”
In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.
As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”
At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.
When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.
In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.
The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.
During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.
The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.
In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.
Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”
The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.
In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.
After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.
The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, engraving and trophy sales, etc… New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.
The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.
The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.
The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:
* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc…)
* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence…)
* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.
* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things …).
* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.
* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).
* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).
* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).
* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc…).
* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.
* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.
What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc… were far away places that most had not visited.
As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.
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Wall Mirrors 101

Wall mirrors come in various dimensions, shapes, and prices. Since wall mirrors are able to reflect light, they will visually make a narrow space or small room seem larger. There are many styles of wall mirrors, including elaborate and contemporary among many others.

Etched wall mirrors come with artwork imprinted on the glass. The artwork can be simple to ornate, and there are many choices ranging from elaborate scenes to images of animals among many others. Hand etching, laser etching, or even acid etching is employed to create the beautiful decorative image. There are kits as well as instructions available to make an etched design on a plain mirror.

One of the widely available mirrors is the framed large rectangular wall mirror. Quite often, frames are made from wood. However, there are elaborate wall mirrors framed in turquoise, cowhide, mother of pearl, and other exotic materials. Framed wall mirrors create an impression of being bigger than they really are. The price of these mirrors varies depending on the frame quality and size. Custom-made mirrors are quite expensive because of the labor involved.

When selecting a framed type of a large rectangular wall mirror, you should make sure the framing compliments other accessories in your room. For example, if your room contains sturdy or bold furniture, go for a mirror with a heavy sort of frame. You should paint wood-framed wall mirrors in a similar color to that of the wall as it creates a feeling of a bigger space. You can add some visual interest to your room using carved mirrors, one of the types of framed wall mirrors. Some wood-framed wall mirrors include intricate, unique carvings and may be carved into modern shapes.

Angled, beveled, or edges-on wall mirrors bring a sleek image to a room. Some beveled wall mirrors have no frames while others are framed with beveled edges. And unlike a framed or molded mirror, a beveled edge frameless mirror gives some reflective surface to the whole mirror. Beveled edges serve as prisms and produced richly-colored reflections of light. Compared to framed mirrors, beveled edge frames are likely to cost more. There are kits available to add an overlay to the bevel mirror and improve its appearance.

Wall mirrors contain a piece of crystal clear glass coated with numerous copper and silver layers as well as paint sealer. Wall mirrors should always be dry, except when they are being cleaned. You should use warm clean water, alcohol, or vinegar to clean the mirror. If you are using a commercial glass cleaner on the mirror, don’t spray it, rather use a soft cloth to spray the cleaner and then use it on the mirror. For stubborn stains, make the cloth wet again and apply pressure. Don’t use a gritty cloth or an abrasive cleaner.

When choosing a wall mirror to buy, you will be dictated by your personal preference and taste but just remember to keep it simple. There is nothing worse than choosing designs that will clash with other decorative items in your room.

Heather Mitchell is a featured writer for UniqueMirrorsOnline.com, where you can find the perfect rectangular wall mirror for your space!

Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Ready to Rock
glass etching designs
Image by familymwr
Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Ready to Rock

Photo By: MSGT Dale Atkins

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History

After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.
On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.
In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work… Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm…”
In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.
In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion …to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”
Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.
To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.
The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.
After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.
Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.
Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.
Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.
In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.
Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.
While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.
In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”
The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.
In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”
In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.
The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”
In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.
As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”
At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.
When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.
In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.
The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.
During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.
The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.
In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.
Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”
The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.
In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.
After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.
The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, engraving and trophy sales, etc… New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.
The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.
The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.
The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:
* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc…)
* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence…)
* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.
* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things …).
* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.
* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).
* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).
* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).
* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc…).
* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.
* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.
What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc… were far away places that most had not visited.
As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.
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Characteristics of Laser Engraving Materials

Laser engravers are used to created detailed designs in the surface of nearly any material. These images have extremely high resolution and can have very fine features. One of the fastest growing uses has been to create keepsakes by engraving photographs onto durable surfaces like stone tiles.

For all of the versatility of the laser, different materials react in different ways to the engraving process.

Wood and Paper

One of the first uses of laser engravers was to burn designs into wooden surfaces. The wood burns easily so can be engraved by low-wattage lasers. Hardwoods such as oak or mahogany work best. Softer woods can produce inconsistent etching depths and have been known to actually ignite during the etching. Use of the lowest wattage lasers is recommended for these projects.

Fiberboard and hard paper work very well with laser engraving. Linty papers and newsprint tend to respond like soft woods.

Plastics

Acrylic is one of the most common plastics used with laser engravers. It holds the etch well and produces a breathtaking finished piece. Other successful plastics include Bakelite and similar hard plastics.

Softer plastics, such as styrene, tend to melt around the engraving producing a softer or even deformed look. This might be acceptable or even desired depending on the purpose of the engraving.

Special plastics have been developed specifically for laser engraving. These may include silicates to help keep the heat of the laser from melting excess material, or may be layered so that etching away the surface reveals colored layers below.

Many plastics such as vinyl or silicones simply don’t work with laser engraving and require other methods.

Metals

Standard metals require specific, short-wavelength lasers and therefore don’t work in most laser engravers. However coated metals perform quite well since, rather than vaporizing the metal, the lasers vaporize the coating to reveal the metal underneath. Common examples include painted brass and anodized aluminum.

Stone and Glass

Stone and glass are difficult to engrave with lasers and are often better served by other engraving techniques. However when used successfully, laser engraving creates a distinctive pattern of tiny fractures that produces beautiful and durable pieces. Granite is a particularly successful medium since once it is successfully engraved, its durability means it will last for decades even if used for applications like floor tiles.

Glass is also commonly used with sub-surface laser engravers. These engrave the image under the surface of the glass, often in three dimensions, to create stunning keepsakes that other engraving methods can’t equal.

Other Materials

Laser engraving is often used successfully with leather, producing a burned look that resembles hot branding. Latex rubber is also an effective material and laser engravers are often used to make rubber stamps.

Author is a freelance copywriter. For more information on Laser
Engravers
, visit http://www.jamiesonlaser.com.

2006 Featherlite H-3 45, #0139 – SOLD
glass etching designs
Image by MillenniumLuxuryCoaches
2006 Featherlite H-3 45, #0139
Slide: 3

MODEL 2006 Featherlite H3-45
LENGTH 45.0 FT
TYPE Prevost
ENGINE TYPE Detroit Diesel Series
FUEL TYPE Diesel
SLIDES Three (3)
COLOR Custom
STOCK NUM #0139

COACH SPEC SHEET
Year: 2006 Mileage: 71,068
Make: Featherlite Engine: DDEC IV Series 60/500 HP
Model:H3-45 Triple Slide Trans: Allison HD 4060 – 6 spd.
VIN: 2PCV3349951010139 Floorplan: Triple Crown
Exterior Colors: Black – Gray – Red
Entry/Helm: Blue Pearl Granite steps w/no slip stainless strips and hidden shoe box – Gray leather dash
with Carbon Fiber dash inserts – Matching leather Pilot and Co-Pilot six way adjustable ISRI seats –
Electric cell shades – Large color adjustable back up monitor – AM/FM CD player – PC Miller Truckers
Navigation – Pneumatic tilt and telescopic steering wheel – Cruise control – Dash A/C w/auxiliary option –
Prevost leveling system – Allison retarder – Trailer brake – On Star – CB Radio – 5’ Co-Pilot TV.
Salon: Blue Pearl Granite floors with stainless inserts – Leather Ekorne recliner with leather Ottoman –
Workstation – Designer leather & fabric sofa/electric unfolding and folding bed – Decorative mirrored
ceiling with fiber optic lighting – 42” LCD drop down TV over pilots area – LED rope lighting – Bose
surround sound – DVD – In-motion Satellite.
Galley: Smoke colored Vitracore cabinetry – Blue Pearl Granite floors with stainless inserts – Corian
counter tops – 2 burner Kenyon cook-top – residential Jenn-Air Refrigerator with freezer drawer –
Advantium Convection microwave – storage space – Wine Rack display – Adjustable J-Lounge with over
head storage – chandelier.
Bath/Passage: Corian counter tops with integrated Corian sink – Private Lavatory with sink and storage
– Blue Pearl Granite floors with stainless inserts – exhaust fan – large Shower with elegant laser etched
glass artwork.
Stateroom: Custom designed mirrored ceilings with Fiber optic lighting – 42” LCD TV – Bose Surround
Sound – DVD and Satellite – Aiphone – King Bed – Black overhead Vitricore Cabinetry and Smoke
Vitricore throughout – smoke detector – Large lit laser etched glass display in rear with female silhouette
– contemporary Fabrica carpeting.
Exterior: 4 air horns – painted mirrors with heat – front lower Stainless inserts – driving lights – polished
Alcoa wheels with chrome lug covers – Bay Lights – Gerard Power Awning – (3) Zip Dee Power Slide
Awnings – mud flaps with stiffeners.
Tanks:
Diesel – 235 US Gallons Black – 80
Grey – 80 Fresh – 165
Systems: Power Tech 17.5 KW Generator – (2) Xantrex 4000 Watt Inverters – 4 Cruise Airs – Aqua Hot –
In Motion Satellite System – Power Shore Cord – Mach 5 water pump.
Bays: Curbside: 1st Full Open Bay with Joey Bed – 2nd Full open bay with Joey Bed – 3rd 17.5 KW Power
tech Generator and (2) 4000 Watt Xantrex Inverters w/ air chuck – 4th Entertainment Bay ( 32” Sony LCD
TV, Surround Sound and Pioneer Radio) – 5th Plumbing Bay
Road Side: 1st Full Open Bay with Joey Bed – 2nd Full open bay with Joey Bed – 3rd Cruise Airs –
4th Battery Bay (8 8D Batteries) – 5th Pluming Bay.

While every attempt has been made to provide an accurate
equipment listing and mileage statement Millennium is not
responsible for errors or omissions.

The Right Bathroom Vanity For You

When you begin looking at the different styles and set ups for a new bathroom vanity you need to make the right decision. There may be a good chance that when you left the original bathroom mirror in place when you moved into the home. It didn’t matter if the mirror was the wrong size. While looking at any type of renovation project for your bathroom make sure you add some personality. But you also need to understand how to choose the right mirror.

The choice you make when looking for a bathroom vanity can show your personality and the exact style you are going for. A decorative mirror is not the only piece that is controlled totally by you. The mirror should be placed at eye level. This is an important element for your restroom because your guests will focus on all the finer details of the mirror.

Since you were a teenager you have been more than likely using a bathroom vanity mirror to get yourself ready for school or work. In a public bathroom you will find a mirror over the sink so you can check your appearance. There may be a chance that you have been looking at yourself in the mirror since you were an infant and your guests may have also.

Your bathroom design should show everyone that you have some sense of style and can present the theme to your guests. It’s a difficult decision to develop a theme similar to the image you are trying to project especially with your guests as they enter and leave your bathroom. The most common designs are plain and simple. These bathrooms are warm pleasant rooms with plenty of personality. You can achieve this feeling by picking out the right style of bathroom vanity with a matching mirror.

After figuring out which style you want to lean towards with your bathroom vanity, you will have many choices to make. For that warm feeling in your bathroom, you will need to find the right earthy tone. When painting your bathroom walls with a nice ivory tone, it may be difficult deciding which accent color to use. Using some type of stunning color such as a red or green against the ivory would be great. If you want to add a more natural feel to your restroom a wooden vanity and framed mirror would be the right choice.

To complete your bathroom you need a flooring style that will compliment the overall design. A hardwood floor that matches the tone of the bathroom vanity can set the right mood in your restroom. Be sure that you find a wood floor style that coordinates well with the rest of the bathroom and it may even match the counter top.
As you finish up with your personalized bathroom look into purchasing a bathroom vanity with silver or gold glass etching that sits several inches from its frame. Warmer colors work well with gold and for a simple and smooth style use silver to add some personality.

This Article is brought to you by the team at Quality Bathroom Vanities. For more information about Bathroom Vanity Furniture Contact them at 1-866-44-Decor.

“Wardlow”, Parkville, Victoria Australia
glass etching designs
Image by Rexness
Wardlow was built by CC Fewster in 1888 for John Boyes, owner of the Brunswick Iron Foundry. The architect is not known, but was possibly by the partnership of Twentyman & Askew, who three years later designed a warehouse for Boyes in Russell Street, contracting to the same builder, Fewster.

Wardlow was the substantial element of a larger development that began with 110 and 112 Park Drive and later included the adjoining houses at 33, 35, and 37 Degraves Street, finished in 1889. All the houses had cast iron decoration from Boyes’ Brunswick Foundry, and also share other details including tessellated pavements and decorative patterns etched into the exterior render.

Wardlow is in an excellent state of preservation because of successive ownership and occupation by several generations of the Boyes family until 1975. The exterior of the house and layout of the garden are virtually as they were in 1888. The side and rear courtyards were created in the 1990s.

The interior decorative scheme retains many elements. The drawing room and dining room retain their respective characteristic masculine and feminine schemes. The entrance hall, drawing room, dining room and parlour retain decorative wallpapers; gilded pelmets survive in the dining room and study; joinery and doors are wood grained in imitation of walnut, with gold stencilling. Original leadlight and coloured glass sidelights to the front door light the entrance hallway. The name Wardlow is etched in the ruby glass in the transom light over the front door. In the hallway the floor is partly laid with encaustic tessellated tiles, and original wall and ceiling paper and cornices enriched with plaster mouldings also survive. The drawing room has original silk and velvet curtains and an overmantel.

The service areas have been substantially modernised although a panel of seven servant bells, with associated cranks and wires, survive in the kitchen vestibule.

The first floor rooms were redecorated in the 1920s and 1930s, but retain some of their Venetian blinds. Original wallpapers identical to those in the main hallway survive in the first floor passageway. A new bathroom was installed in an upstairs bedroom in the 1990s.
(Source: Heritage Victoria)

"On a day focused upon world poverty, the cycles of disadvantage and wealth turned full circle at Melbourne’s biggest property auction yesterday.

About 400 inner-suburban property watchers turned out to see Wardlow, the Italianate Parkville mansion formerly occupied by the financially troubled couple Andrew Landeryou and Kimberley Kitching, sell at auction for .84 million.

The seller was Melbourne businessman Solomon Lew’s company Jordanlane. Mr Lew claims he is owed million by the now-separated couple as a result of a failed joint business venture."

(Source: "The Age" July 3 2005)

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Types Of Modifications For Custom Awards And Plaques

The awards you see handed out at school, business, and work functions aren’t processed out of a cookie-cutter design. There are many choices in the style, imprinting, and custom options available to the schools and businesses that obtain them for awarding excellence.

The most common awards are comprised of at least some portion of glass, while some are even created entirely of the material. Glass is easily molded into shapes, and can be easily etched to make for interesting designs. The molding process in particular is a great place to start if you want to create an award that is quite unlike what you have previously seen.

The part of the award that seems to get the least attention would be the base. The base is usually seen as a block of metal or glass that doesn’t add much value to the award, over than to create a sturdy stand for the award to sit on. The base can be engraved and etched as well, and can even be professional painted and designed to draw more attention to the award. At the same time, you should also consider keeping things simple.

The etching process of award creation has been refined through new technology to allow the process to create stunning designs on glass awards. The etching process can be done with a new type of accuracy, as special etching machines can do the work based on a supplied image or stream of text. Because of the precision, you could have a design that knows no bounds in complexity.

The metal awards you see can be just as pliable as glass. The only difference s that they go through an engraving process, which can be a little more complex than simple etching of glass. Metal awards do tend to be a bit more expensive for the more intricate designs, but you also get the benefit of a more unique award. If you find the right custom awards shop, you can even have your own awards created specifically for your purpose.

Hand made awards are a thing of the past- unless you need one that has unprecedented quality. For any other occasion, having a custom award dealer handle your thoughts is the best bet. Estimates on pricing can also be given in a meeting, so that you can see what would be best for your budget. Also remember that going to more than one dealer could prove to be a very spendthrift decision in the end.

Closing Comments

Custom awards are the quickest way to show someone that they have done well in their expertise- and it’s a great feeling for both the recipient and the presenter! Start looking over the Internet for good prices on custom awards you would like to learn more about.

Font 2011
glass etching designs
Image by Leo Reynolds
rtist: Tessa Phillips and Rachel Hadjiphilippou
Title: Font 2011
Material: glass pool

The brief was to respond to the theme Baskerville. The Baskerville typeface takes its name from John Baskerville (1706 – 1775) the pioneering printer who revolutionised the printing process. It was designed in Birmingham in 1757. The winning team were BA(Hons) Visual Studies students Tessa Phillips and Rachel Hadjiphilippou.

Their design was inspired by the riverside setting and draws the passers-by in through a sculpture that invites speculation about the boundaries between appearance and reality. The sculpture is a glass pool with an extract from Paradise Lost etched below the surface of the glass. Paradise Lost was the first book to be printed using the Baskerville font.

From Paradise Lost:

They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.

Norwich, Norfolk, England, UK

Pros And Cons Of Different Types Of Natural Stone Construction

You can find several different types of natural stone which are used for high-end household construction that can be found at many tile stores. Each provides a set of rewards over other options plus a few shortcomings. Different kinds of stone also offer various effects for the room in which they are used.

In the space below, we will present essentially the most typically-used varieties of natural stone, and describe a few of their particular advantages and drawbacks

Along the way, we will furthermore provide ideas regarding where each variety is best installed. Our goal is to help you to pick the most suitable stone for your residence given your needs.

Marble

The materials that comprise marble make it the very least durable of the collection. It delivers a veined, streaming appearance, with large, rounded lines cutting through patches of solid color; the variants in coloring are often preferred by individuals who enjoy a lack of consistency in the physical appearance of stone work.

Marble is a soft stone, which makes it inappropriate for places that draw in significant foot traffic. It’s additionally vulnerable to staining (a good seal will help to prevent damage). Lots of people enjoy marble on flooring surfaces, kitchen countertops, and fireplace mantles.

Travertine

This stone contains pores, which provide it with a distinct visual appeal. The color designs vary tremendously from block to block, so mindful selection is important to assure a nice match for large areas (e.g. floor). A benefit to utilizing travertine stone is that the coloring variants and softer, earthy tones makes it fairly resistant to tendencies in natural stone work.

Like marble, it is relatively soft. For that reason, it might be inappropriate for flooring surfaces in kitchen areas, foyers, and similarly high-traffic areas. In addition to flooring surfaces in low-traffic spaces, travertine is frequently utilized for kitchen countertops, basins, and the perimeters surrounding pools.

Sandstone

Sandstone provides a simple, streaked overall look through natural colors, for example brown and tan. Like travertine, this implies it can withstand interior design trends. The natural stone is much more long-lasting than marble and travertine, and as a result can be used as floors in rooms that get a higher level of traffic. It’s also a well-known choice for tiling on walls.

Among the drawbacks to sandstone is that it is porous; it must be well-sealed so as to avoid unsightly stains.

Slate

This rock, like the others, provides a broad variation in color. Having said that, the colors are generally more dark. Slate offers a room a non-urban overall look that can alleviate harsh light, making the room feel much more comfortable. A unique advantage of this stone is that its surface area is varied, in contrast to smooth. This helps prevent slipping. Another benefit is that slate is harder and long lasting, and may be applied in most parts of a home.

It must be sealed to prevent stains from fluids. Additionally, the natural stone is dense, which will increase its weight and may make it awkward to lift and install.

Limestone

Limestone is available in earthy tones, but from a much wider variety than that offered by travertine and sandstone. The designs it exhibits lack uniformity (much like other sorts of stone), and color variations are understated

The softer types of limestone are especially well-suited to counters, but may be scratched if care is not provided for them. The harder varieties are appropriate for flooring.

A pitfall with limestone is that softer kinds can sustain etching, even after the stone has been sealed. Harder types are much less prone.

Granite

This natural stone will come in shades that traverse a wide range. It poses a mottled look. Due to its straightforward physical appearance, granite is typically used in stores and professional offices. It’s a very hard stone, and can be installed in places that receive a large amount of foot traffic, which includes kitchens, hallways, and bathrooms.

One of the disadvantages of granite is that cutting and shaping the pieces generally requires specialized equipment. The reason is because of the stone’s firmness factor.

As noted, the six types of stone described above need to be sealed so as to keep out dampness and protect against staining. In addition, particular types stand up less well in specific environments. Ask your supplier to clarify these and additional details before set up.

Want to find out more about tile stores in Denver? Then visit Decorative Materials.

To learn more about tile stores in Denver, please visit

Glass etched soliers
glass etching designs
Image by lovestruck.
Fragment of a huge glass etched Millenium Window in the cloisters of Worcester Cathedral..

The Millenium Window was designed by Mark Cazalet. and depicts 1000 years of "the inspired Christian life".
The artist says "The Worcester Cathedral millennium window pioneered a new technique of working on two sheets of laminated glass allowing three overlapping surfaces to etch and engrave onto.".

The Millenium Window was designed by Mark Cazalet. and depicts 1000 years of "the inspired Christian life".
The artist says "The Worcester Cathedral millennium window pioneered a new technique of working on two sheets of laminated glass allowing three overlapping surfaces to etch and engrave onto.".

Plaid Enterprises is releasing a new line of glass paints from Martha Stewart. This video features Kristin St. Clair from Martha Stewart Crafts™, and in it watch how she demonstrates how easy it is to use Martha Stewart Crafts™ etching cream and adhesive stencils. With these materials see her create a beautiful monogrammed designs on a glass tumbler. For more information on Martha Stewart Crafts http://www.plaidonline.com/martha-stewart/brand/detail.htm
Video Rating: / 5

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Personalized Glasses As An Epitome Of Personal Success

In life, a man will come a moment when he wants to celebrate, and tell to the world that he has finally reached a certain level of success and achievement he has aimed for all his life. He sometimes celebrates this moment by throwing a party with his family or friends, or he may give himself a pat on the back by buying something for himself. Or he may buy something closer to his heart like a set of personalized glasses.

Just like any ordinary drinking glass, personality and uniqueness is what sets apart a set of personalized glasses. They are usually harbour elegant designs like monograms or other intricate designs including corporate logos etched onto their surface.

Should you choose to have a personal monogram to truly show the world a personal symbol of your achievements, the monogram will be placed on to your chosen glass through a process called hand engraving. This is the best way for a monogram since the cuts will be deep and clearer and also more detailed. Should you choose other designs like a corporate logo, the design will be sandblasted onto the glass by a process called satin etching.

Once you have chosen the type of design, whether it be a logo or monogram, another critical decision will be the type of glass you will be using to hallmark your success. Should you choose ordinary glass or something more fancy and regal like crystal to etch your design onto? The former definitely is abundant and the latter more expensive and will take time to procure.

If you choose a crystal glass this will definitely make you dig into your pockets a little deeper. Despite their beauty, their refractory abilities with light make them a joy to behold as they can split light into a myriad colors when light hits them. They also have sound capabilities in that they emit a note when the edges are moistened slight and rubbed with your fingers.

Whatever your choice for your goblet of success, it will definitely be something to showcase to the world something that reflects your achievements and yourself.

Before you buy any glassware, make sure you check Wealthwood’s top quality personalized glasses, and personalized drinking glasses

Antiques & Appraisals
glass etching designs
Image by josstyk
I can’t get enough of ornamental design and this new etched glass door for the local antique shop is simply gorgeous.

Blast Your Way To More Creative Decorations

Domestic and commercial decorations come in many styles and materials. One way to really spruce up your home with a personalized touch is to etch a pattern into some kind of hard material such as glass, concrete, or stone. To do this, a special material is used to protect the area around the etching. This material is called the sandblast resist. The design is cut or carved into the material, and this is called the sandblast stencil. There really is not limit to the designs that can be created with this material using this method.

Most hard surface materials can be treated or “cut” with this technique. The only substance that cannot be used is diamond, simply because diamond is harder than the abrasive material that is used to cut the pattern. Not only is the technique used for decorating areas of the home, such as the glass in the front door or the house number carved into the concrete walkway up to that door, but it is used for such applications as gravestones and cleaning old metal and painted wood surfaces.

The application is accomplished by using a pattern cut into the protective sheet in the design that will end up as the decoration. The pattern can usually be cut with simple cutting tools like x-acto knives or razor cutters. Once the pattern is complete, the protective sheet is placed over the surface that will be etched. By using air pressure, the particles of abrasive media are blasted into the decorative pattern, etching into the hard surface. The closer the air blasting nozzle gets to the surface, the deeper the etching becomes. Moving closer also narrows the area being etched, allowing more intricate work. Etching away more of the surface in small areas gives more depth and texture to the finished work. The part of the surface that is covered is not etched at all. The end result is a pleasing decoration that will last a lifetime.

While hard surfaces can be treated with this technique, you can also etch surfaces of materials that are not as hard and get decorations that are smaller. Basically, the harder materials include the above-mentioned glass, stone and concrete, but steel, aluminum, silver, and other metals can be decorated. The most common softer materials that are etched include wood and plastic. Oddly enough, the abrasive materials used for the soft substrates can even include glass beads, plastic pellets, and walnut shells. Common use of softer surfaces that are treated like wood and plastic are commonly seen as wall decorations or even as art. House numbers etched in wood and painted make a nice decoration displayed next to the front door. Many restaurants have used this type of decoration to display a theme for their establishment such as numerous hangings throughout the restaurant with seafood and ocean scenes.

Using this blasting technique can be a cost saver for commercial enterprises like restaurants. The patterns are easy to cut, and can even be designed by a graphic designer on a computer and cut into the desired patterns by a computer aided design application. Of course, this is all done by a commercial operation that specializes in such designs, but the cost-savings really can be significant while producing decorations that are specifically created with that restaurant in mind.

Stewart Wrighter recently worked with a sandblast resist firm as he sought quotes for an abatement project. He searched the term sandblast stencil to find a company that provided this service.

Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Mountain Still
glass etching designs
Image by familymwr
Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Mountain Still

Photo By: PO3 Stephen Gonzalez

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History

After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.
On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.
In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work… Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm…”
In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.
In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion …to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”
Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.
To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.
The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.
After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.
Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.
Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.
Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.
In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.
Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.
While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.
In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”
The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.
In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”
In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.
The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”
In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.
As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”
At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.
When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.
In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.
The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.
During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.
The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.
In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.
Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”
The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.
In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.
After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.
The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, engraving and trophy sales, etc… New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.
The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.
The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.
The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:
* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc…)
* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence…)
* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.
* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things …).
* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.
* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).
* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).
* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).
* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc…).
* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.
* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.
What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc… were far away places that most had not visited.
As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.
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Place reversed glass etching stencil design on bottom of glass plate so it will last longer. Create a stencil for a glass etching project with the tips in this free video on how to etch glass from a crafts expert.

Expert: Robin Westover
Bio: Robin Westover has been creating jewelry and crafts for more than 30 years.
Filmmaker: joseph wilkins
Video Rating: / 5

Personalized Glasses As Unique Gift Ideas

Sometimes, it is pretty hard to get men a really unique and personalized gift. Women have it easier since there are a lot of stores and outlets that cater to women’s needs and liking. Quite rarely do you find stores that specialize in gifts for men. Some of the most easy and very unique gift ideas for men come in the form of customized glasses. These glasses come in handy for those who have a mini bar or even do a lot of entertaining.

Customized glasses are drink ware that are customized and functional. It serves both as a gift and as something he can use. These glasses are great for your dad’s birthday or as a gift to your best man or even during Father’s day and Christmas day. You can even give customized glasses to your female friends with unique sayings and designs.

Customized glasses can be personalized with a small message and a name and date. Some have even brought the customization to a whole new level by coloring the glass surface and the effect you get is a stained glass effect. You can get your glasses such as wine glasses, shot glasses, martini glasses, goblets and even whiskey glasses. Get the type of glasses that are normally used by that person for drinking their beverages. There is also the barware collection available that comes with beautiful crystal decanters, matching glasses, carafes and ice buckets. All of them can be personalized with the name and message of your choice as well as some designs. You can also give wine sets with customized glasses, totes and bottle stoppers.

Shot glasses make for great customized glasses. In most outlets, you can buy a pack of four, 6 or 8 glasses with each glass having its own message or you can have all glasses having the same message or design on them. When planning on presenting gifts of customized glasses to your family or friends, sit down with the engraving artist to come up with designs that look nice on glasses. You may have your own design in your mind but at times, what looks good on paper may not be so appealing on glass. The engraving artist will be able to tell you what looks good and what doesn’t. At times, the engraver may be able to refine the design that you have chosen to suit the glass surface. Also, keep in mind that there are only certain types of fonts that can be used on etching or engraving on glass since glass may bring out a different effect from the fonts.

It is best to include a saying or quote that they would normally use. Some people are known among their friends and family from the lingo that they always use. Or you can include a tagline that the both of you know the connection with it. There was once a couple who made personalized glasses and engraved it with the cute names that they call each other. There are many designs and messages that are great to be accompanied with funny taglines and quotes. These glasses make for perfect favors as they can be used over and over again for drinking sessions with their friends.

Kim is the author of Discountmugs.com. If you would like more information about Glassware, please visit http://www.discountmugs.com

Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – I Can See You Now
glass etching designs
Image by familymwr
Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – I Can See You Now

Photo By: SSG Robert Stewart

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History

After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.
On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.
In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work… Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm…”
In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.
In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion …to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”
Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.
To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.
The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.
After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.
Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.
Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.
Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.
In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.
Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.
While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.
In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”
The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.
In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”
In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.
The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”
In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.
As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”
At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.
When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.
In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.
The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.
During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.
The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.
In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.
Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”
The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.
In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.
After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.
The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, engraving and trophy sales, etc… New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.
The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.
The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.
The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:
* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc…)
* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence…)
* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.
* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things …).
* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.
* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).
* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).
* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).
* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc…).
* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.
* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.
What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc… were far away places that most had not visited.
As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.
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